BATA Chief Executive to Speak At London Aviation Conference

Simon Buck, Chief Executive of BATA, will be speaking at ‘A New Aviation Policy: what does the UK really need? – a conference being held in London on 27th September.

BATA Chief Executive Speaking at Aviation Conference

A New Aviation Policy; What does the UK really need? 27th September, Eversheds, London

The future of aviation is at a turning point. At last, the Government is firming up its new aviation policy. As we embark upon the biggest changes the aviation sector has seen for several years, this event brings together key industry players to debate the future of aviation.

Where is capacity really needed and what is a viable solution? How can we secure regional access and what is the impact on the UK economy? How will the inclusion of aviation in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme impact on future aviation growth?

This timely event will offer the UK’s air transport sector a much needed platform for debate as we enter a new era for aviation. Hear from a range of stakeholders on what the priorities are, join the debate on what the UK really needs, and be the first to find out which direction the Coalition Government’s new aviation strategy is headed.

Speakers include:

Simon Buck Chief Executive British Air Transport Association

Dan Edwards Head of Economic Policy and International Aviation Civil Aviation Authority

Matt Sheldon Senior Policy Advisor CBI

Sir Roger Bone President Boeing (UK and Ireland)

Home Affairs Select Committee Report on ‘Work of the Border Force’: BATA Reaction

BATA’s reaction to today’s publication of the report by the Home Affairs Select Committee on the work of the Border Force.

BATA Comment on Home Affairs Select Committee Report ‘The Work of the Border Force’

Commenting on the findings of the Home Affairs Select Committee Report on the work of the Border Force, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association (BATA), said:

“Robust border controls are essential for the safety and security of the State and its citizens. BATA members have supported the Home Office and UK Border Agency in this objective for many years, investing millions in a wide range of initiatives to “export the border” such as the e-borders programme which harnesses technology to deliver advance passenger information (APIS) to the control authorities. In so doing, this provides for more efficient and speedier throughput of legitimate travellers through UK border controls while maintaining border security.

“However, existing targets for average delays set by Border Force of 25 minutes for clearing European Economic Area (EEA) passengers and 45 minutes for non-EEA passengers are not demanding enough. Airlines want to see target average delays replaced by target maximum delays and see times brought down. It is essential that airlines are part of that discussion and we made this offer to the Home Secretary earlier this year.

BATA airlines have offered to work with Border Force to maintain the integrity of the border while taking a balanced approach, involving the greater use of technology as an aid to the screening of passengers prior to arrival at the border control point. We look forward to taking this work forward in collaboration.”

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Reaction to Rail Investment Announcement

BATA’s reaction to the announcement today (16th July) by the Government about plans for over £9 billion of public support for investment in rail infrastructure, having just delayed yet again any decision on increasing airport capacity.

BATA Reaction to Government Announcement on Rail Investment

Reacting to today’s announcement of government plans for further public investment in the rail system, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association (BATA), said:

“While all transport investment should be welcomed, the spectacle of the PM and Deputy PM falling over themselves to trumpet the merits of £9.4 billion in public support for investment in railway infrastructure, contrasts sharply with the ostrich-like head in the sand approach the Government is continuing adopt towards the need for new airport capacity. The much-anticipated ‘Call for Evidence’ to address this issue was only last week yet again delayed “until the autumn” – meaning the Government doesn’t even want to hear the arguments, never mind actually make a decision.

“Investment in domestic railway schemes is undoubtedly good news for the UK construction industry and rail users but will do precisely nothing to enhance the UK’s international connectivity with emerging world economies. Instead, we are losing out on competing for air links to new markets against our European neighbours through having a lack of runway capacity in the busy south east.

“Ironically, airport investment is almost exclusively privately funded, requiring no public funding. Now wouldn’t that have been a good thing for the PM and Deputy PM to crow about – new airport capacity to boost international trade links, inward investment and new jobs at no cost to the taxpayer?”

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BATA Comment on Publication of DfT Draft Aviation Policy Framework

BATA has issued this commentreacting to the publication by the DfT today of the draft aviation policy framework consultation.

BATA Comment on Publication of DfT Draft Aviation Policy Framework

Commenting on the publication today of the aviation policy consultation by the Department for Transport, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association (BATA), said:

“BATA regrets the further delay in publication of the full consultation that follows the DfT Scoping Document published last year. Originally anticipated in March, the second stage of the consultation was delayed until July and we now have further delay of a substantive part addressing airport capacity and the UK’s international connectivity until the autumn.

It is vital for the UK’s economic prosperity that we have an aviation policy that addresses the needs of all the UK. The Government cannot keep on kicking this issue into the long grass while our competitors gain at our expense.”

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BATA Chairman Reappointed For Another Three Year Term

BATA has announced that Dr Barry Humphreys has been reappointed as Chairman for another three year period, from 1st May 2012.

BATA Chairman Reappointed

The British Air Transport Association (BATA), the trade body representing UK airlines, has reappointed Dr Barry Humphreys as its Chairman for a further three years from 1st May.

A former economic adviser and Head of Air Services Policy to the UK Civil Aviation Authority, Dr Humphreys served with Virgin Atlantic Airways as Director of External Affairs and Route Development before his appointment as BATA’s part-time Chairman in May 2009.

Commenting on Dr Humphreys’s reappointment, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of BATA said:

“I am very pleased Barry has accepted reappointment as BATA’s Chairman. Barry’s wisdom and experience have been greatly valued by BATA and we look forward to continuing to benefit from Barry’s advice over the next three years.”

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BATA Meets With Home Secretary About Border Queues – Comment

BATA has issued this comment, following the meeting earlier today with the Home Secretary on the subject of border queues.

BATA Comment Following Constructive Meeting With Home Secretary on Border Queues

The British Air Transport Association (BATA) is the trade body representing UK airlines. Following our meeting with the Home Secretary today (3rd May) , we make the following statement:

EFFICIENT BORDER CONTROLS AND MANAGEMENT OF QUEUES
· Robust border controls are essential for the safety and security of the State and its citizens.
· BATA members have supported the Home Office and UK Border Agency in this objective for many years, investing millions in a wide range of initiatives to “export the border” such as the e-borders programme which harnesses technology to deliver advance passenger information (APIS) to the control authorities.
· In so doing, this provides for more efficient and speedier throughput of legitimate travellers through UK border controls while maintaining border security.

WHAT IS THE PROBLEM?
· Over the past few years, staff levels at UKBA have been reduced and procedures have been streamlined in line with technological capability.
· The current passenger experience of frequent and excessive delays is unacceptable for legitimate travellers.
· BATA and its members want to see a Border Force with the resources and flexibility to support robust border security checks and deliver a good passenger experience at the same time.
· Airlines do not accept that a secure border and a good standard of service offering minimal delays to passengers are incompatible objectives.

WHAT DO WE WANT?
· Existing target average delays at the border of 25 minutes for EEA passengers and 45 minutes for non-EEA passengers is not demanding enough.
· Airlines want to see target average delays replaced by target maximum delays and see times brought down.
· It is essential that airlines are part of that discussion and have made this offer to the Home Secretary.

SHORT TERM FIX
· In the short term, the problem may be eased by pumping in temporary additional resources – but as the Home Secretary acknowledges a sticking plaster solution is not the answer.

LONG TERM FIX
· For the longer term, airlines have offered to work with Border Force to maintain the integrity of the border while taking a balanced approach, involving the greater use of technology as an aid to the screening of passengers prior to arrival at the border control point.
· We were pleased the Home Secretary accepted the value of working together.

NEED FOR ADEQUATE RESOURCING
· It is essential that best use is made of available and flexible resources and that they are matched to demand in a way that can be sustained over the longer term in terms of maintaining robust border controls while delivering a good passenger experience.

WHAT IF ADDITIONAL FUNDS ARE NEEDED?
· Unlike with public transport, aviation infrastructure is privately funded.
· Airlines do not believe they should be expected to pay for additional resources for Border Force. Instead, any additional funds should be drawn from the £2.9 billion of Air Passenger Duty paid by air passengers this year. This tax on flying is the highest such tax in the world and using some of this money to pay for additional staff resources for Border Force would be an effective andappropriate use of a fraction of this otherwise punitive tax on air travellers.

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Budget 2012 – BATA Comment

BATA has commented on today’s Budget statement, which confirmed increases in Air Passenger Duty from April 1st and also set out the rises due to take effect from April 2013.

BATA Reaction to Budget

Commenting on today’s Budget, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association said:

“I offer only two cheers for the Government following the Budget. The Chancellor makes some promising noises on addressing the lack of airport capacity in the South East but if aviation is to play its part in driving an export led recovery we need a proper aviation policy for the whole of the UK now and not yet more consultation. The UK is losing business now and missing out on developing international links with growing world economies. It is simply not good enough to be fobbed off by the prospect of an expensive new airport in a remote part of the Thames Estuary where nobody lives in twenty years time. By then, it will be too late.

The Chancellor also confirms that the world’s highest taxes on flying will get even higher from 1st April this year when UK Air Passenger Duty increases by a whopping 8%. Next year it is set to rise again by a further £2 and £4 per passenger. These level of increases cannot be sustained and make it more expensive for British families to go on a sunshine holiday and for overseas tourists to visit Britain. This lack of joined up thinking must be addressed and we urge the Government to undertake an independent study of the damage the tax is doing to the UK economy.”

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“A Tax On Tourism” – Aviation Industry’s Pre-Budget Message to the Chancellor

As a signatory to joint industry letter, published in the Daily Telegraph today (15th March), ahead of the Budget next week, BATA has urged the Chancellor to re-think his plans for a double inflation increase in Air Passenger Duty and to freeze the tax on flying this year.

Letter published in the ‘Daily Telegraph’ on Thursday 15th March 2012

A tax on tourism

SIR – You report (March 12) that Air Passenger Duty (APD) is hitting the travelling public hard here in the UK. The consequences of levying Europe’s highest aviation tax will also be felt by incoming tourists. In the year of the Olympics, when we should be doing everything to encourage tourism, we’re likely to see some potential visitors avoiding the UK altogether.

Furthermore, those who do plan to come are finding ways to avoid paying APD: airport arrivals at European cities with high-speed rail links to London are already registering higher than normal air bookings, suggesting that some tourists plan to circumvent the tax through combined air-rail travel.

On Wednesday, George Osborne, the Chancellor, will present his Budget, at which he plans to increase APD from this April by doubling the rate of inflation. On behalf of the travelling public and the many thousands of businesses that depend on inbound tourism, we urge him to re-think his plans and to freeze APD this year.

John Parkin
Chief Executive, Leeds Bradford Airport

Simon J L Buck

Chief Executive, British Air Transport Association

Mary Rance

Chief Executive, UKInbound

Darren Caplan

Chief Executive, Airport Operators Association

Tracey Poggio

Chairman, Association of National Tourist Offices and Representatives

Mike Carrivick

Chief Executive, Board of Airline Representatives in the UK

Mark Tanzer
Chief Executive, ABTA — The Travel Association

“Aviation is the Economy” – Industry unites and calls on Government to be bold

The three leading trade associations in the aviation sector (BATA, the Airport Operators Association and ADS Group) have come together to call on the Government to be bold, when it launches its consultation on aviation policy next month.

Aviation Industry Unites To Press Government For Bold Policy

The three leading trade associations in the aviation sector have come together to call on the Government to be bold, when it launches its consultation on aviation policy next month.
In a joint statement released today, ADS Group (ADS), the Airport Operators Association (AOA) and the British Air Transport Association (BATA) representing over 2,800 aviation manufacturers, airports and airlines respectively say:

“As the Coalition Government recognises, the UK’s economy needs to compete in both established and emerging markets. This requires excellent aviation connectivity right across the country, ensuring the UK has both vibrant point to point airports and sufficient world class hub capacity. This means prioritising a favourable planning and regulatory regime and developing a bold aviation policy, permitting new airport capacity where required. To ensure there is no further erosion of the UK’s competitive position, the Government must set a clear timetable for these measures to be put in place, as part of a new aviation policy.”

To draw attention to the issue, the trade associations have published the cartoon pictured below.

Next month the government publishes its draft framework for aviation… Don’t play games and risk our international competitiveness. Aviation IS the economy

BATA CEO, Simon Buck, said:
“Aviation is directly responsible for nearly a million jobs*. If one looks at the wider visitor economy as a whole, its direct and indirect impact is 8.2% of GDP, equivalent to £114 bn and 2.6m jobs**.”

ADS Deputy CEO and MD Aerospace, Graham Chisnall, added:
“Britain has the world’s second largest aerospace manufacturing sector. However, this is a globally competitive business so we need policies that nurture the industry and keep its high-tech jobs in the UK.”

AOA Chief Executive, Darren Caplan said:
“Last November, the Treasury recognised the importance aviation plays in connecting the whole of the national economy and in fostering links with existing and emerging overseas economies. Number 10 now needs to support aviation too, and to act fast to ensure we have the aviation network and capacity required for the UK to grow. Delay will simply cost the country jobs, businesses and routes to our international trading partners.”

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* Source: Oxford Economics 2011
** Source: Visit Britain/ Tourism Alliance/ Deloitte 2008
For interviews, high resolution images, and more information please contact:
Paul Baldwin, [email protected], Tel: 0208 288 8928, Mob: 07800 745 129

Notes to Editors
ADS Group
ADS is the premier trade organisation for all companies operating in the UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space sectors. Farnborough International Limited (FIL), which runs the Farnborough International Airshow, is a wholly owned subsidiary. ADS also encompasses the British Aviation Group (BAG). For more information see www.adsgroup.org.uk.

AOA
The Airport Operators Association (AOA) is a membership organisation comprising a total of 68 airport companies from across the country. An additional 160 plus companies are Associate Members, representing a broad range of suppliers to the aviation industry. As such, it is the national voice of UK airports. Its vision is of a vibrant airports’ sector which can maintain sustainable growth, sufficient to meet the social and economic needs of the UK.

BATA
BATA is the trade association for UK-registered airlines. Its members cover a wide range of airline services, carry 119 million passengers, 1 million tonnes of cargo and produce 96% of UK airline output.

Between them, BATA members operate to most parts of the world, employing over 71,000 staff and a fleet of more than 770 aircraft.

5 Weeks To Budget – Chancellor Urged to Act on APD

With only five weeks left until the Budget on 21st March, BATA has urged the Chancellor to scrap the planned rises in Air Passenger Duty (APD).

5 Weeks To Go – Chancellor Urged To Act On APD In Budget

With just five weeks to go until Budget Day, Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association, said:

“The Government is investing more than £120 million over the next four years to encourage millions more overseas tourists to visit Britain. This is an ambitious but important objective and vital for UK tourism and jobs, given, for example, that France attracts six times as many Chinese tourists compared to the UK.

Due to our geography, most foreign tourists visit the UK by air. But the UK has the highest taxes on flying in the world and George Osborne is planning on further increasing this tax by 8% from 1st April – over twice the rate of inflation.

This will mean UK taxes on flying will be almost ten times as high as the European average. However, several European countries such as Ireland and the Netherlands have drastically reduced or scrapped their taxes on flying because of the damage they do to their tourist industry.

With just five weeks to go before the Budget, the Chancellor needs to ditch the increases he has planned and announce a phase out of the tax if the Government is serious about boosting UK tourism.”

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Notes to Editors
 BATA is the trade body for UK-registered airlines, with members representing all sectors of the industry.
 In 2010, BATA members employed over 71,000 people, operated four-fifths of the UK commercial aircraft fleet and were responsible for some 96% of UK airline output, carrying 119 million passengers and 1 million tonnes of cargo.
 The ten BATA member airlines are: bmi, British Airways, DHL, easyJet, flybe, Jet2.com, Monarch, Thomas Cook, Thomson Airways and Virgin Atlantic.
 The Budget is being held on 21st March.
 Details of the UK‟s „GREAT‟ campaign aimed at increasing the number of tourists visiting the UK can be found at the DCMS website:
http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/media_releases/8753.aspx
and at the Visit Britain website: http://www.visitbritain.org/aboutus/marketing/marketingprogramme/index.aspx